Polish Citizenship
& Family History

Lost Histories is the original and longest-serving private Polish research bureau in Australia, and one of the longest-serving in the world. We have 24 years’ experience in the field of research, and 16 years’ experience with Polish citizenship/ Polish passports – with hundreds of satisfied clients behind us.

We are genuine historical, genealogical and citizenship specialists. This work is not done “on the side” but constitutes our life’s work and passion. We have earned a reputation for commitment to our clients and for our specialised knowledge that only time and hard work can provide.
 

Our consultancy specialises in:

  • Polish Citizenship & Passport Assistance
    We source the relevant documents from Poland and other countries, leading you through all aspects of the application. We have done hundreds of Polish citizenship applications since Poland joined the EU in 2004. This has given us hard-earned experience in the complex field of Polish citizenship laws.
  • Polish-Jewish Genealogy & Documentation
    Researching Polish family trees of all denominations, finding vital records, and locating Holocaust documentation from Poland.
  • Translations Services
    Translations from Polish, Russian, German, proving you with prompt service at reasonable rates.
  • Recording Family Histories
    Recording and preserving your family history.
  • Polish Travel Assistance
    Liaising with specialist researchers, interpreters and guides to assist in tracing your roots or in your travels to eastern Europe. Polish travel can be arranged with research in Poland before you arrive, to make your trip more meaningful.
  • Editing Manuscripts
    We have provided Polish-Jewish genealogy & documentation research for a number of successful publications.

For Israeli clients, we work with our sister bureau in Israel, run by Anat (www.nicko-poland.com) who was once one of our clients!

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Lost Histories was founded in 1997 by Krystyna Duszniak (MA History, University of Melbourne), a professional historian, with a Masters Degree in History from the University of Melbourne, Australia. She has written academically and lectured in the history of the Holocaust and Genocide, Modern Jewish History, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. She is a Polish-English accredited translator, registered with NAATI.

Krystyna was co-founder of Dialog, a second-generation Polish-Jewish dialogue group in Melbourne, and is a recipient of the Australian Society of Polish Jews and Their Descendants Henryk Slawik Award, for “fostering understanding, respect and strong ties between Jewish and non-Jewish Poles”. Krystyna has many years’ experience in Polish archives and maintains professional links with researchers in Poland, Israel, Ukraine, Belarus, Belgium, Lithuania, the United States and Canada.

Krystyna Duszniak is the daughter of Janusz Jacek Wyszogrodzki whose love, devotion, heroism, knowledge, and love of Polish history and literature inspired her to devote her own life to Polish history, with a specialisation in Polish-Jewish history of the 20th century.

Why Choose Lost Histories?

Before you choose a research bureau or a Polish citizenship expert, please consider the following:

  • We’ve been in business for 22 years and are experts on citizenship and history.
  • We’re cheaper than our competition by a long shot.
  • We work in 2-hour instalments, NO LUMP SUMS! You can SEE what we do for your money.
  • We provide you a clear, itemised summary of costs at the beginning.
  • Our work is honest and transparent.
  • You get fast, personalised service.
  • We won’t waste your money if you’re not eligible for Polish citizenship. We assess your eligibility for free, at the beginning, before you decide if you want to come on board as our client.
  • A satisfied client is our best advertisement! See these two articles as examples:

    The Journey to Polish Citizenship
    (article from The Jerusalem Post, April 2019)
    An Expat Gets Polish Citizenship–and the Right to Live in Europe
    (article from The Wall Street Journal, May 2015)